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Corporate Culture


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A Uniting Culture for the New Multicultural Workplace
  By: Susan Dunn
Never has it been more important in your organization to have a common language, and never has it been more elusive.

An Emotionally Intelligent Workplace Culture: Is It For You?
  By: Susan Dunn
If emotional intelligence is this important to the functioning of an individual, what would happen if you established a workplace culture of emotional intelligence?

Corporate Consistency
  By: John Mehrmann

A business can be defined by the same character traits that are typically associated with an individual personality. A business can be bold, aggressive, compassionate, inconsiderate, caring, trustworthy, deceptive, cautious, or friendly. A business is often the reflection of the conglomeration of members, leadership, and an accumulation of character traits. If a company is large, the character traits may be influenced by years of pride of internal culture. If the company is small to medium, the character is often a direct reflection of the leadership or ownership of the company. Regardless of the size, a business is a collection of individuals and talents, and it is a collection of personalities that define the character of the company.


Corporate Culture Re-defined
  By: Malcolm Evans

This analytical article attempts to lay out the main types of corporate culture which will are found in real life, beyond the pages of academic textbooks which often seem woefully disconnected from workplace reality.


Culture and Customer Loyalty
   But Will They Love Me Tomorrow? Thriving With Customers Through Corporate Culture
  By: Dr. A. J. Schuler
You are the CEO of a successful, thriving business. You 've watched your business grow from its inception to its current standing as a recognized player in its market niche. Observers applaud, though no one knows better than you do how hard it has been to get to this point. And that's why now you're terrified: will they still love me tomorrow? No, not the industry watchers, but the customers?

Exception is a Poor Rule
  By: Jim Clemmer
The high-performance cultures are those that radiate sincere recognition. It's also clear that they're led by managers with well-developed personal recognition skills. They know that brains and hearts go where they are truly appreciated.

Leaders Care for Organization Culture and Context
  By: Jim Clemmer
Redefining a leader's role from operational manager to context leader, can be one of the key factors in the success of dealing with change in the organization. They spend less time managing the day-to-day business and more time caring for the organization's culture.

Pathways and Pitfalls to Living Organizational Values
  By: Jim Clemmer
Core values are critical to effectively leading people. Discover the Living Organizational Values approaches that can help you to avoid the pitfalls and pave your organization's pathway to success.

The Pattern Repeats Itself In Your Business Unless You Get Conscious
  By: Susan Dunn
Litigious words such as "mobbing" and "bullying" partially describe what would be called a "dysfunctional workplace" in psychological terms, "hell" to the people involved who want nevertheless to do good work, "damaging" to a business' reputation and ability to attract the best and retain them, "detrimental to the bottom line" by the astute CEO, and "long-lasting" to those who understand human behavior.

The Stages of Culture Shock
  By: Thomas W. McKee
People who have lived in a foreign country for over one year find that they move through these five stages: tourist, foreigner, explorer, neighbor and finally citizen. The same phases can be seen after changes in a corporate culture.

Three Core Questions That Define Organizational Culture
  By: Jim Clemmer
The 3 Ps -- picture or preferred future, principles, and purpose -- are critically important questions. Our answers to these three basic questions define the team and/or organizational culture we are trying to create.


Place "+" (without the quotes) in front of words that must appear; "-" to exclude articles with certain words; and put double quotes around phrases. For example, fantastic search will find all case studies with either the word "fantastic" or "search" (or both). On the other hand, +fantastic +search will find only case studies with the words "fantastic" and "search". "fantastic search" will find only case studies that with the phrase "fantastic search". Note: Searches will not find words, such as 'management', that appear in more than half of the articles or words less than five letters long.

 


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