Business Management Articles

 
Advertisement

Accounting & Audits


Place "+" (without the quotes) in front of words that must appear; "-" to exclude articles with certain words; and put double quotes around phrases. For example, fantastic search will find all case studies with either the word "fantastic" or "search" (or both). On the other hand, +fantastic +search will find only case studies with the words "fantastic" and "search". "fantastic search" will find only case studies that with the phrase "fantastic search". Note: Searches will not find words, such as 'management', that appear in more than half of the articles or words less than five letters long.


Do Accounting Rules Discourage Research & Development?
  By: Michael Sack Elmaleh

Businesses spend billions of dollars trying to develop new and better products, These outlays are referred to as research and development (R & D) costs. Accounting rule makers have struggled with how best to classify such expenditures. Should they be treated as expenses or assets?


Energizing your Internal Audits
  By: Robert Badner
This process can help develop a foundation to create a checklist for the internal audit. With your developed checklist you can drive improvement in the quality system with the audit results.

Measuring Non Profit Efficiency: The Statement of Functional Expense
  By: Michael Sack Elmaleh

Accounting provides some measure of a firm's economic efficiency on its income statement. A large net income usually tells us that something has gone right, while a large loss indicates that something is amiss. The same cannot be said about a non profit's income statements (usually called the Statements of Revenue and Expense). Since the central goal of a non profit is to provide services, not earn large profits, the absence of a profit is not a mark against the organization. As an alternative to the income statement, accounting attempts to measure a non profit's efficiency on a financial statement called the Statement of Functional Expenses (SFE).


Sunk Costs and Loss Aversion
  By: Michael Sack Elmaleh
Cost accounting teaches us to ignore sunk costs. Easier said then done because ignoring sunk costs often entails admitting poor decisions and accepting unrecoverable losses.


Place "+" (without the quotes) in front of words that must appear; "-" to exclude articles with certain words; and put double quotes around phrases. For example, fantastic search will find all case studies with either the word "fantastic" or "search" (or both). On the other hand, +fantastic +search will find only case studies with the words "fantastic" and "search". "fantastic search" will find only case studies that with the phrase "fantastic search". Note: Searches will not find words, such as 'management', that appear in more than half of the articles or words less than five letters long.

 


Would you like us to consider your own articles for publication? Please review our submission and editorial guidelines by clicking here.